You likely associate auto accidents with collisions between two or more moving vehicles. While these may be the most common occurrences, they are not the only ones. There are other sources of auto accidents to be aware of not only to avoid them, but also to recognize when you have a personal injury lawsuit.

These additional causes include road conditions, auto-part defects, pedestrians and cyclists. Although they do not involve other motorists, they can be just as dangerous.

Road conditions

You can be the only person on the road and still get into a crash due to poorly maintained roads, obstructions and missing signage. Possible responsible parties include:

  • Municipalities
  • Transportation departments
  • Construction companies
  • Utility companies
  • Homeowners

You rightly rely on proper engineering, repairs and signs to eliminate hazards. Anything less constitutes negligence.

Auto-part defects

Just as important to your safety is your vehicle. Some of the reasons you may have chosen the make and model you did were for its highly rated safety features, precision, quality, size and technology. If an essential part malfunctions, or the manufacturer recalls a product, you can easily get into an accident and become injured. 

Pedestrians

Walking down the street and getting hit by a car falls under the category of auto accidents. According to PennDOT, city intersections have the highest rate of pedestrian injuries. Drivers may not stop at a sign or light, give you the right of way or pay attention to the road. On the other hand, motorists are not always at fault. You may be a safe driver and unintentionally hit a pedestrian who is jaywalking, drunk or distracted on a cellphone.

Cyclists

Collisions between cars and bicycles are another form of motor vehicle accidents. Just as with pedestrian accidents, the fault can lie with either party. Drivers may not pay attention to cyclists’ hand signals or share the road. Cyclists may ride in restricted areas or lack the necessary reflectors and lights for night riding. Both parties must take accountability for their part in keeping themselves and others safe.