Accidents can occur in many different types of situations in Pennsylvania and could be caused by a number of different problems. Some are the kind that are commonly described as freak accidents, and it is almost impossible to take measures to prevent these from occurring. However, many other types of accidents could be prevented with the proper safety equipment or procedures being in place. That is why the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has so many safety requirements for companies.

Many times these safety requirements can add costs to a job or cause them to take more time. So, there are many companies and/or workers that do not always follow the requirements. OSHA receives many complaints for violations, but some are more common than others. The most common violations include, but are not limited to, falls at construction sites, communication issues for hazards at the workplace; problems with scaffolding and ladders; respiratory protections; proper safety guards for machines; electrical wiring problems; and others.

Unfortunately OSHA does not always discover the violations until after a worker is hurt though. They may be able to fix the problem after the fact, but that does not help the injured worker. The worker can be left in a very difficult position if they suffer significant injuries which require medical treatment for a long period of time and they are unable to work. Luckily, workers in this position may be able to pursue workers’ compensation to help them financially with lost income and medical bills.

There are many workers who are injured each year in Pennsylvania and this can put them in a very difficult financial and physical situation. These workers may seek workers’ compensation benefits, which can at least help with the financial issues facing the victim. However, workers’ compensation is paid by insurance companies who may try to minimize the damages and their liability. It is important that the worker gets what they deserve, and experienced attorneys may be a useful resource.

Source: osha.gov, “Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards” accessed Feb. 5, 2018