Wage replacement benefits through the workers’ compensation system should help you maintain a reasonable standard of living while you recover from an injury. This is similar to the way that some economic damages work in personal injury cases.

The time you have to take off of work represents a financial loss to you. So does any reduced capacity to work. Therefore, the choice of when to go back to work is often nuanced.

Benefits and return to work

FindLaw states that you can still collect Workers’ Compensation wage benefits after returning to your company, in some cases. For example, if your employer offered you a reduced schedule or a lower-paying position, you might still get compensation for the loss in wages.

As the article mentions, different states have different requirements for employers retraining and rehiring workers after an injury-related hiatus. Therefore, you would have to resolve any disputes you have in the context of Pennsylvania’s unique laws.

Medical concerns with a return to work

Of course, your health is also a concern. If your employer is pressuring you to return to work and you do not feel that you are ready, there could be a conflict of interest.

Sometimes, your employers might be pressuring you because they believe it would be cheaper to get you back to work than to hire a temporary replacement. In other cases, they might have some misconceptions about the way that Workers’ Compensation insurance works, they might be receiving pressure from their insurance company or any number of other reasons.

In other words, your employer’s pressure likely comes from a financial or business concern. It is unlikely to come from a professional medical opinion.

Many injuries, especially serious injuries on the job, take some time to recover. You deserve a chance to become as healthy as possible before you risk injury once again for an employer.